Hurricane Florence: Over 188,000 without power as monster storm batters Carolinas

Michele Stevens
September 14, 2018

By late Thursday afternoon, Florence's fierce headwinds were already uprooting trees and tearing down power lines and had ripped the roof off of at least one building in coastal North Carolina, according to news station WGHP.

Some people who had rejected calls to evacuate the targeted area took walks along the water as they tried to enjoy a few final hours of normalcy before Florence's fury arrived.

After that, Florence is forecast to move northwest and north and move across western SC on Sunday, Sept. 15, and across western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee on Monday, Sept. 16, the NHC said.

More than 370,000 people were without power in North Carolina early on Friday, state officials said.

Schools and businesses closed as far south as Georgia, airlines cancelled more than 1,500 flights, and coastal towns in the Carolinas were largely emptied out.

It added the greatest threats to life came from storm-surges while "catastrophic flash flooding and prolonged significant river flooding" was expected, with some areas receiving up to 40 inches of rainfall.

The National Weather Service shared images of Union Point on the shore at New Bern before and after the storm surge hit.

Trump faced severe criticism for his administration's response to Hurricane Maria a year ago in Puerto Rico.

Jen Kottyan, the avian collection and conservation manager for the zoo, said the ways the zoo is preparing are very similar to how people might brace for a storm at home: filling tubs with water for drinking and cleaning, making sure facilities are equipped with flashlights and batteries, and clearing drains to guard against flooding.


As Florence drew near, President Donald Trump tweeted that FEMA and first responders are "supplied and ready", and he disputed the official conclusion that almost 3,000 people died in Puerto Rico, claiming the figure was a Democratic plot to make him look bad. She said a hurricane has a way of bringing everyone to the same level.

With a storm surge warning in effect, the authorities urge people to prepare themselves for the disaster.

The rising sea crept toward the two-story home of Tom Copeland, who lives on a spit of land surrounded by water in Swansboro.

Duke Energy told Fox News 3 million customers, which represents about 75 percent of their customers in the Carolinas, could lose power.

The full impact of storm surge on the coast will depend on whether the storm's arrival coincides with high tide.

At 11 a.m., the center of Tropical Storm Isaac was located by NOAA Hurricane Hunter aircraft data and surface observations 50 miles southwest of Dominica.

Cooper said the hurricane was "wreaking havoc" on the coast and could wipe out entire communities as it makes its "violent grind across our state for days".

The East Coast isn't the only area facing the brunt of a storm. "I should stay in my house, where I have water and food".

Still, he said: "I feel like the dumbest human being who ever walked the face of the earth". "We were able to evacuate quite a few; some did not go", he said.

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