Boeing issues safety bulletin after Lion Air crash

Minnie Murray
November 9, 2018

Safety investigators said that pilots on the plane were dealing with inaccurate airspeed readings and asked to return to the airport just before the crash.

The sensor - which helps the plane's computers determine if its nose is too high in the air - had been the cause of problems on the aircraft's last four flights before the crash. It could lead to "excessive nose-down attitude, significant altitude loss, and possible impact with the terrain", it...

Boeing Co. says it has issued a safety bulletin that reiterates guidelines on how pilots should respond to erroneous data from an "angle of attack" sensor following last week's crash of a Boeing plane in Indonesia that killed 189 people.

Representatives of 737 MAX operators, Singapore Airlines Ltd SIAL.SI offshoot SilkAir, Garuda Indonesia GIAA.JK and Canada's WestJet Ltd WJA.TO , said they had not yet received a bulletin from Boeing.

"On November 6 2018, Boeing issued an operations manual bulletin (OMB) directing operators to existing flightcrew procedures to address circumstances where there is erroneous input from an AOA sensor".

Indonesian investigators said this week the plane had an air-speed indicator problem on the doomed flight and on three previous journeys.

All 181 passengers and eight crew members on board the aircraft died after it crashed into the Java Sea shortly after takeoff from Jakarta.


This issue is said to arise only during manual flight.

The left wing of the Lion Air Boeing 737-900 plane collided with the metal post as the aircraft was heading to the runway at the Fatmawati airport in Bengkulu, Indonesia. According to NBC News, the warning revolves around what pilots should do if the plane gives an erroneous reading from a sensor.

"A "ping" has been detected from the second black box but the signal was very weak, possibly because it was encased in mud", said Nurcahyo Utomo, an air accident official at the transportation safety committee (KNKT).

The Lion Air investigation comes after Indonesia's government ordered an inspection of all Boeing 737 Max 8 planes in the country.

The airworthiness directive covers all 737-8 and 737-9 aircraft and is similar to a service bulletin issued by Boeing, after the manufacturer conducted an analysis in the wake of the fatal Lion Air crash on October 29.

Boeing has delivered 219 737 MAX jets to customers globally, with 4,564 orders for jets yet to be delivered. As pilots worked to correct it, it would let them-briefly interrupting the autopilot's control-but then continue attempting to pitch the airplane downward.

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